Our mission is to promote and protect the human rights of all Alaskans including immigrants, refugees and Alaska Native communities by providing critical services to these underserved populations, including legal representation, language interpretative services, training and educational programs.

About Us

Founded in 2005, the Alaska Institute for Justice is the only agency in Alaska dedicated to protecting the human rights of immigrants and refugees. Based in Anchorage and Juneau, our staff provides statewide comprehensive immigration legal services, as well as language interpretation and translation services throughout Alaska. Collectively, AIJ Board and Staff have more than 25 years of legal experience serving Alaska’s immigrants and refugees.

Legal Services

AIJ staff provides services statewide, traveling to many communities throughout Alaska including, Unalaska, Sitka, Ketchikan, Kodiak, Juneau, Fairbanks, Kenai and Homer. AIJ’s legal service priorities include representing immigrant crime victims and people fleeing persecution and torture in their home countries. Our staff also assists human trafficking victims and Alaskan families seeking to reunite with family members residing outside of the United States.

In addition to providing quality direct legal services, AIJ staff members serve as a critical resource for state and federal public agencies on issues involving immigrants and refugees. Health care providers, social service providers, state officials, criminal defense attorneys, prosecutors and judges are just a few of the professionals in our state who rely on the expertise of the AIJ staff.

Language Interpreter Center

In 2007, AIJ opened the first statewide Language Interpreter Center (LIC). The LIC partners the public and private sector to offer statewide training for language interpreters as well as provide referral services for all businesses and agencies in need of language interpreter services. The LIC is working with foreign language interpreters as well as Alaska Native interpreters.

Learn about AIJ’s history and impact through the series, “Human Rights: Legal, Social, and Climate Justice”

The Alaska Institute for Justice’s (AIJ) mission is to promote and protect the human rights of all Alaskans, including immigrants, refugees, crime victims including survivors of domestic violence and sexual assault, and Alaska Native communities by providing critical services to these underserved populations through legal representation, language access, training, and educational programs and advocating for climate justice.

This series of six articles, Human Rights: Legal, Social, and Climate Justice, explores the origins of AIJ 16 years ago, the various programs it offers, and its impact on our state in its unwavering devotion to preserving and defending the rights of all Alaskans.

Alaska Institute for Justice protecting human rights and promoting social justice since 2005

The Anchorage Press, OCTOBER 7 – OCTOBER 13, 2021


For 16 years, the Alaska Institute for Justice has worked tirelessly to promote social justice, serving nearly 7,000 Alaskans since its inception in 2005. Although its beginnings were humble, the services that the organization, then known as the Alaska Immigration Justice Project, provides were and continue to be indispensable.

Navigating the immigration system in this country is a perilous journey. The rules are complex and ever-changing, and justice moves slowly. For those whose first language is not English, especially

those fleeing untenable and often dangerous conditions in their home country, adjusting their immigration status can seem like an insurmountable task. Many are victims of human trafficking or violent crimes and sexual abuse.

Immigration attorneys Robin Bronen, Mara Kimmel, and Jason Baumetz, among others, were facing this crisis first-hand when they worked at what was then called the Immigration and Refugee Services Program (now the Refugee Assistance and Immigration Services Program. When that program closed in February 2005, they quickly realized that the community’s need for low-cost or pro bono legal assistance was burgeoning and could simply not be ignored. Numerous community members and partner organizations stood behind them in their effort to form a new non-profit to serve those so desperately in need of their help. [Read More]

 

The Alaska Immigration Project’s enduring commitment

The Anchorage Press, OCTOBER 21 – OCTOBER 27, 2021


The Alaska Institute for Justice’s inaugural program, the Alaska Immigration Justice Project, began in 2005 as a response to a pressing need for legal representation for immigrants in the state.

And although AIJ’s mission has expanded over the years to include climate change work, and the Language Interpreter Center, the Immigration Justice Project remains its flagship program; then, and still, AIJ is the sole statewide organization dedicated to providing low-cost and free immigration legal assistance and language access services to Alaskans.

Over the past 16 years, founding members Mara Kimmel, Robin Bronen, and Jason Baumetz have been joined by a talented and diverse staff, backed by a hands-on board of directors, volunteer attorneys and wide community support. The Immigration Justice Project fills a vital and urgent need for legal representation statewide; the majority of clients, some 65 percent, are victims of domestic violence and sexual abuse. [Read More]

 

 

The Alaska Institute for Justice’s Pro Bono Asylum Project

The Anchorage Press, NOVEMBER 4 – NOVEMBER 10, 2021


A former corporate lawyer for Conoco Phillips, Rodgers began taking on pro bono asylum cases in his spare time in 1998. After retiring from his day job in 2008, he’s been representing clients in asylum and other pro bono immigration cases full time and helping other attorneys do the same.

Rodgers personally has worked on 30 asylum cases and has mentored dozens of attorneys through another 50. Asylum law is much more than an interest, for Rodgers, it’s a dedication born of

a passion for justice, and helping people escape peril and persecution in their home countries.

From his first case, involving a man from El Salvador who had fled civil war, he was hooked. [Read More]

 

 

 

The Alaska Institute for Justice’s Language Interpreter Center

The Anchorage Press, NOVEMBER 18 – NOVEMBER 24, 2021

Nestled on the east side of Alaska’s largest city of Anchorage is the most diverse neighborhood in America: Mountain View.

With over 100 different languages spoken by families in the Anchorage School District, census data show that 16.3 percent of Anchorage residents speak a language other than English at home.

Alaska is home to at least 20 distinct indigenous languages. In Bethel, Alaska, 63 percent of the community speaks a language other than English at home. In September 2007 the Language Interpreter Center (LIC) was formed as a collaborative, public-private organization dedicated to creating a pool of trained language interpreters for entities statewide to increase access to legal, social, educational, and medical services to Alaskans with limited English proficiency. [Read More]

Anchorage Staff and Additional Languages Spoken

Robin Bronen, JD PhD, Spanish
Executive Director

Indra Arriaga, Spanish
Grants & Operational Director

Legal Program Director, Korean

Supervising Attorney, Spanish

Volunteer Staff Attorney

Human Trafficking Staff Attorney/Case Manager, Spanish

Carmen Sanchez
Grant Manager/Rural Outreach Coordinator, Spanish

Mai La Vang
Language Interpreter Center Program Director, Hmong

Juneau Staff and Additional Languages Spoken

Kari Robinson, JD
Deputy Director

Ivette Lugo, MCJ
Rural Outreach Coordinator/Paralegal, Spanish

Awards

  • 2017 Carla Timpone Award for Activism presented to Kari Robinson, AIJ Deputy Director, from the Alaska Women’s Lobby for her hard work, dedication and leadership and advocacy on behalf of Alaskan women, children and families
  • 2017 First Lady’s Volunteer of the Year Award presented to Dan Rodgers for his outstanding volunteer work for the Alaska Immigration Justice Project
  • 2014 Bridge Builders Anchorage Award presented to the Alaska Immigration Justice Project in recognition for excellence in community service
  • May 2014 Alaska Bar Association Robert K. Hickerson Public Service Award presented to Dan Rodgers in honor of his outstanding dedication and service in the provision of pro bono legal services and legal services to low income persons
  • February 2014 Certificate of Appreciation awarded to the Alaska Institute for Justice in recognition for outstanding sacrifice and special kind help for activities of Wat Loa of Anchorage
  • 2013 Soroptimist International of Anchorage Advancing the Status of Women Award presented to the Alaska immigration Justice Project by Senator Mark Begich
  • 2012 FBI Director’s Community Leadership Award presented to the Alaska Immigration Justice Project in recognition of outstanding contributions to our nation’s communities through unselfish dedication and leadership
  • 2010 Alaska Bar Association Pro Bono Lifetime Achievement Award presented to Dan Rodgers
  • May 2010 Alaska Bar Association International Law Section First Annual Human Rights Award presented to Robin Bronen in honor of her outstanding dedication and service in protecting the human rights of immigrants and refugees in Alaska
  • 2007 Mayor’s Community & Non-profit Organization Diversity Appreciation Award presented to the Alaska Immigration Justice Project
  • May 2007 Alaska Bar Association Robert K. Hickerson Public Service Award presented to Robin Bronen in honor of her outstanding dedication and service in the provision of Pro Bono legal services

AIJ Newsletters

AIJ Newsletter – July 2017
AIJ Newsletter – January 2017
AIJ Newsletter December 2015
AIJ Newsletter Spring 2014
AIJ Newsletter December 2012
AIJ Newsletter Spring 2011
AIJ Newsletter Winter 2011
AIJ Newsletter Winter 2010